Animation + trigger messages = love? | StickyStan

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Animation + trigger messages = love?

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GIF-pictures and cinemagraphs are usually placed in advertising letters. However, these elements can work fine in trigger messages as well. Trigger messages are at least 10 times more effective than usual emails. The open rate of personalized trigger messages is 25% higher, and the number of unique clicks is 51% higher than the standard emails.

Usually, all trigger letters are personalized and are sent to interested users those who have recently subscribed to the newsletter or made a purchase. 72% of email marketers who used GIFs or cinemagraphs showed an increase in the “transaction by clicks” indicator.

If trigger messages and emails with animation are usually more effective than standard letters, then why do not we combine these two techniques?

Use animations in welcome emails, as purchase reminder and while confirming the order and you will be able to surprise new and regular customers.

We would like to offer you a few fresh examples of the use of animation. Most of the images are from advertising emails, but you can apply these ideas in trigger or service emails.

Unlike a regular advertising mailing, which does not last long, trigger campaigns can last for months, and for some brands, even for years. If you plan to add animation to trigger emails, it is important not to make some mistake. For example, the user is likely to delete the letter if he sees eight flickering pictures under a sparkling header. A modest animation and a minimum of text, on the contrary, will attract attention.

Benefits of using an animated GIF in your email campaigns

  • GIFs make it easy to explain complicated concepts. If you’re sending an announcement about a website redesign or how to do something tech-y, creating a custom GIF can help your subscribers get the point without getting too confused.
  • They can boost engagement (and ROI). A very simple custom GIF for product launches or promotional emails can help spark interest and encourage readers to click through. Dell led the way in 2014 when the company managed to increase revenue by 109% through a GIF-centric email campaign.
  • GIFs are an excellent replacement for video. Most email clients don’t support embedded video. Plus, videos are heavy data-wise. A properly optimized GIF can solve these problems.

When used at the right time with the right content and the right audience segment, GIFs can make up a vital part of your email marketing strategy. The key is understanding how and when to send them out.

When shouldn’t you attach an animated GIF to email campaigns?

Although GIFs will work great for certain segments of your audience and certain email campaigns, they may not be the best choice for every campaign every time. You might want to step away from the GIF editor if you think the following situations apply.

  • GIFs can get annoying. Older generations may not appreciate a picture that moves without a play and stops button – especially if it moves too quickly for them to read what’s on the screen. Likewise, all age groups might get annoyed with (or desensitized to) GIF campaigns sent on a regular basis.
  • They’re heavy. With 53% of all emails opened on mobile devices, you should consider the size of your GIF emails and the amount of data they’ll consume.
  • GIFs aren’t supported by all email clients. A lot of people browsing their inbox through old-school style email clients may see an error box instead of the flashy GIF you spent so much time on. Other email service providers may only display the first slide.
  • They can be harmful to certain people. Fast moving GIFs aren’t a good choice for any subscribers with epilepsy or vision problems.
  • You need to stay professional. Keep GIFs away from any emails that are meant to be more on the serious side of things.

Remember that if for some reason the animated picture does not load, the client will see just the background image. This image should be attractive. The picture should not move too fast or too slow. The image should not be too big. Appreciate the time of your subscribers.

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